What 'dope' really is...

The word "Dope" has changed definitions over the years, as far as to which drug it refers.

Originally, it referred to "Airplane Dope" which we know these days as "Model Glue". By squirting the glue into a bag and breathing the fumes, you'd get a good high. The original "dopers" (1940ish?) were ones who did this.

Somewhere along the line (probably 1960s), the definition shifted (mainly because of term-illiterate media people who didn't really know what they were talking about, very similar to how the same idiots have morphed 'hacker' from a good to a bad thing over the years.) to refer to "dope" as marijuana/hemp and people who smoked it as "dopers". While heavy users of the original "dope" (airplane glue) did suffer from actual brain damage, the media tried to portray the use of marijuana (now known as "dope") as causing the same brain damage that airplane glue caused. Which we all know these days is complete FUD.

In the 1990s, with the rise of the use of methampetamine, the word has changed again so that "dope" now means speed. Which leads to confusing situations where an old stoner asks a kid these days if he wants to go smoke some "dope" and the kid is disappointed when the stoner pulls out a bag of weed - something that will make him go to sleep in the next few hours instead of something that will keep him wide awake for several days.
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Comfortably Anonymous
8/12/2006 11:34:42 PM
Comfortably Anonymous
9/9/2006 4:36:45 PM
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