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Satya Nadella's killing cloud

Reminds me of that ancient story where Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella traveled to the peak of Kangchenjunga, the highest mountain in India, with 270 trained mules carrying suppliees for a support team of thousands of trained computer software technicians.

The mountain is one of the deadliest peaks in the world and countless individuals lost their lives as they were attacked by falling rocks and captured by dragons who took their prey back to the nest so that they could be used as chew toys by their offspring.

When they reached the top, they found nothing.  The survivors were suffering serious effects from altitude sickness and the members of the expedition became incredibly uneasy.  What did they come here for?  Nadella turned to his followers and informed them what they needed to hear.

"Behold.  The power of the cloud."

The clear skies quickly turned into a violent maelstrom.  Within seconds, the living team members were envying those who suffered fatal injuries and began burrowing their heads in the snow, attempting to suffocate themselves, knowing that death was the safest way out.

Nadella seemed unconcerned about the well-being of the people who had ventured up to the mountain with him, and he understood that this is what had to be done in order to run a successful business.  He took the stairs back down to the bottom of the mountain.

The next day, Microsoft's stock price went up by thirteen percent, citing "the power of the cloud" and how "Xbox does everything".  On this day, nature had answered Nadella.  Microsoft was forced to pay out tens of millions of dollars to those who lost loved ones on that day, but after the quarterly review came out, everyone concluded it was worth it.

In order to make money, sometimes, you have to make corpses, as Nadella would commonly say in board meetings.  On this day, the whole world knew he was right.

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